Tudor Heritage Ranger Alternatives

Tudor watches have produced a number of nice Ranger style watches, like the Heritage Ranger and the Black Bay.

However, many are not so keen on the modern sized case sizes that these models use.

We really liked how close to a vintage size they were however, which in my opinion is about 38-40 mm for a men’s watch.

So I was trying to think of alternative platforms we could use for possible future retro styled Tudor watches using this old sizing.

As you will see in some examples below, it does include some very interesting looking movements!

I decided to take it upon myself to make an article with as many different alternatives as possible that would fit nicely into what Tudor has done before with their heritage lineups.

You will see that I have included some movements that were not designed as a wristwatch, but would look nice nonetheless.

In case you don’t already know what movement is in your Tudor watch right now, here is a list of all the movements that they use:

ETA 7001 = 2824-2

ETA 7652 = ETA 2836-2 (not for smaller watches)

Valjoux 7750 = ETA Valgranges A07.

111, modified by Tudor to be COSC certified and bi-directional winding capability with additional parts added on.

Also has a hacking feature (where the seconds hand stops when you pull out the crown).

This movement was actually made specifically for the Rolex Daytona watch.

ETA 7750 = ETA 2892-A2, modified by Tudor to be COSC certified and bi-directional winding capability with additional parts added on.

Also has a hacking feature (where the seconds hand stops when you pull out the crown).

This movement was actually made specifically for the Rolex Daytona watch.

ETA 9100 = Sellita SW200-1, modified by Tudor to have a hacking feature (where the seconds hand stops when you pull out the crown), which is common among many of their watches now (which is ironic because it was originally an anti-counterfeiting feature that they copied from Rolexes).

However in most cases, there isn’t a noticeable difference between the ETA 7100 and 9100.

Valjoux 7750(a) = same as above, except with a different final drive gear ratio which is why it has a different name for some reason (probably to be more confusing).

Some people prefer this movement over the regular Valjoux 7750 because it has a higher beat rate of 28,800 bph instead of 25,200 bph.

I am not sure what Tudor did to this movement though to be honest.

Maybe they just used a standard Valjoux 7750 that was modified by someone else and took credit? Or maybe they did make even more modifications? Either way, there is no real difference between these two movements when you compare them side by side (except for that one thing of course).

ETA 2824-2 = Sellita SW200-1, modified by ETA to be COSC certified and hacking feature (where the seconds hand stops when you pull out the crown) like most Tudor movements.

This movement was originally designed for Swatch watches but is also used in some other watch brands also such as Longines, Rado, and Fortis to name a few.

This movement is actually pretty cool because it has quick set date by pressing the hour pusher twice instead of having to do it through setting wheels like with all other watches.

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ETA 2824-2 = This is the movement that was used in most vintage Tudor watches.

You can still find pieces of it on eBay for a few hundred dollars.

It has 17 jewels and beats at 28,800 bph.

It does not hack or have a date window.

Sellita SW200-1 = This is the exact same movement as the ETA 9100 but with slightly different finishing and no COSC certification (as far as I know).

However, I am sure that there are more differences than just this, but they won’t matter to 99% of people.

As long as it keeps good time you should be happy!

There are also other movements that were designed by other manufacturers, but they are not in any of the current Tudor watches.

These include:

ETA 6497-1 = Sellita SW500 (Kellner) 21,600 bph and COSC only beat at 28,800 bph for added accuracy.

This movement has no date window and is hacking, but has quick set date by pressing the hour pusher twice.

If you want accuracy over looks this is a good choice.

Because of the higher beat rate it ticks every 2 seconds instead of 3 like most other movements which can be annoying to some people who are used to Swiss ETA’s 4Hz tick or faster.

It also isn’t as easy to find parts for if you do need service done on it at a later date.

ETA 2893-2 = Sellita SW500 (Kellner) 21,600 bph and COSC only beat at 28,800 bph for added accuracy.

Same as above but no date window and without quick set date by pressing the hour pusher twice.

This movement is very similar to the ETA 6497-1 except with some minor differences like size and jewels.

It used to be in many vintage Tudor watches such as the 7924 featured below along with many others that were powered by this movement.

The reason why they replaced it was because it wasn’t a hacking movement which made it less desirable for watchmakers to work on.

This is more of an oversized watch movement so if you are looking for a more vintage style watch this is the one to get.

ETA 2892 = Sellita SW500 (Valjoux) 21,600 bph and COSC only beat at 28,800 bph for added accuracy.

Has date window but no hacking feature nor does it have quick set date by pressing the hour pusher twice like the other ETA’s that I mentioned above.

This movement is very similar to the ETA 6497-1 except with some minor differences like size and jewels.

It used to be in many vintage Tudor watches such as the 7924 featured below along with many others that were powered by this movement.

The reason why they replaced it was because it wasn’t a hacking movement which made it less desirable for watchmakers to work on.

This is more of an oversized watch movement so if you are looking for a more vintage style watch this is the one to get.

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